Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage   605 Pennsylvania Ave SE  Washington, DC 20003  202-547-3525 Office

Kitty Kaupp       202-255-0952  kaupp.kitty @ gmail.com    Tati Kaupp   202-255-6913  tatikaupp @ gmail.com

kittykaupp.com

 824 D Street SE    $1,995,000  Under Contract

GRANDE DAME of Historic Capitol Hill on Eastern Market Metro Park. This stately Victorian 4 story brick & brownstone bay front TH, 3 story + English Basement, was built in the late 1800’s. This magnificently large home, perfect for entertaining, was restored in 2008 by the current owners.
 
Main house: entry foyer with original slate leads to LR & formal DR defined by columns. Kitchen with custom made cabinets, granite counters and backsplash, 6 burner stove. Light-filled Breakfast /Family Room opens to glorious porch face deep landscaped rear yard and carriage house with deck. Full Basement for work out room, kids playroom ,workspace and/or office.
 
The upper floors: Master BR with marble master bath. Soaking tub and separate shower with dual rain shower heads. Sunny sitting room with wet bar, rear porch & views of roof tops. 2 Bedrooms & 2 Baths plus library and rear porch are on the 2 nd floor.
 
Separate 2 story carriage house has 3 car parking & above 1 Bedroom 1 Bathroom plus Living Room and Kitchen- Apartment. Large deck at entry- Garden room & wet bar, 1/2 BA , useful for entertaining al fresco.
 
This home faces Eastern Market Metro Park, in planning stages with well known architects, Weinstein & Assoc. & Ohme Van Sweden which will create even more lush landscape plans . Elegant Home facing Park is a special architectural gem.
 
 
Charles Gessford, architect/builder (1831-1894). Gessford, who lived at 661 South Carolina Avenue, SE, was one of the best-known builder/ architects on Capitol Hill. His work includes "Philadelphia Row" (132-144 Eleventh Street, SE) and Queen Anne-style brick rowhouses (824-832 D Street, SE; 638-642 East Capitol Street). He also built alley dwellings (Gessford Court). He borrowed to build his houses; when the Depression of 1893 hit, he was left with houses that no one would buy. He died a year later and was buried at Congressional Cemetery.
 

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